Encouraging parents to ask about their children's and adolescents' online searches can help facilitate not only discovery of this information but discussion on these topics.

Online sexting sites-8

View our recording keeping documents View all posters and leaflets Keeping Children Safe in Education Sept 2016 Inspecting Safeguarding in Early Years Child protection and safeguarding policy (DOC, 332 KB) Child protection and safeguarding policy – executive summary of key principles for staff and parents (DOCX, 46.86 KB) Staff Behaviour Policy (Code of Conduct) 2017-18 (DOC, 394 KB) Safeguarding wheel (PPTX, 118.32 KB) Disqualification Declaration Form (PDF, 303.42 KB) Disqualification slides (PDF, 29.14 KB)The childcare (disqualification) regulations 2009Schedule 1 orders etc relating to the care of children Schedule 2 repealed statutory offences Schedule 3 specified offences Apply to waiver disqualification Early Years and childcare provider Children Missing Education Sept 2016 Child protection audit (DOC, 133.5 KB)Safeguarding checklist (doc, 37Kb) Warwickshire MASH Multi-Agency Referral Form (MARF)- Concerns about a Child (DOCX, 2.13 MB)Contact the team for a copy of ‘A guide for Professionals who Infrequently attend Child Protection Case Conferences’ Education establishment recording of parental responsibility (DOCX, 69.06 KB)A guide for Core Group Members leaflet (PDF, 38.21 KB) Guidance for safer working practice Oct 2015 (PDF, 551.4 KB) Use of Images of Children Guidance Dec 2014 (PDF, 557.52 KB) Appendix A – Schools parental consent form (PDF, 34.49 KB) Appendix B – Parental Consent Form – Early Years Foundation Stage (PDF, 34.43 KB) Appendix C (PDF, 34.39 KB) Appendix D Consent Form for Adults depicted in photographs (PDF, 28.09 KB) Appendix E(i) Permission for parents/carers to record still images of children at school events (PDF, 31.08 KB) Appendix E(ii) Permission for parents/carers to record still images of children (PDF, 31.16 KB)Faith groups and safeguarding Enhanced risk analysis frequently asked questions (PDF, 149.94 KB) Tool for assessing environmental hazards (PDF, 48.8 KB) Guidance on the use of force and physical intervention (DOCX, 75.15 KB) Guidance on the use of quiet rooms in Warwickshire schools (Please refer to separate guidance on the use of Low Arousal Areas) (DOCX, 55.53 KB) Appendix 24 guidance on the use of low arousal (DOCX, 47.07 KB) Safeguarding self audit questionnaire 2016 (DOC, 349.5 KB) Safer Recruitment and Employment Model Procedure September 2014 (DOCX, 203.17 KB) Sexting in schools and colleges responding to incidents (PDF, 1.03 MB)View our latest Education Safeguarding Service bulletins.

The Designated Nurse for Warwickshire is responsible for coordinating safeguarding children across Warwickshire; advises and supports Warwickshire Health Trusts and implement their safeguarding children requirements, works closely with the Named Professionals and other agencies The Designated Doctor for Warwickshire is Dr Peter Sidebotham who lead on medical issues around Safeguarding Children.

According to a recent poll, 22% of teenagers log on to their favorite social media site more than 10 times a day, and more than half of adolescents log on to a social media site more than once a day.

Thus, a large part of this generation's social and emotional development is occurring while on the Internet and on cell phones.

Some schools successfully use blogs as teaching tools, Adolescents are finding that they can access online information about their health concerns easily and anonymously.

Excellent health resources are increasingly available to youth on a variety of topics of interest to this population, such as sexually transmitted infections, stress reduction, and signs of depression.

For this reason, it is important that parents become aware of the nature of social media sites, given that not all of them are healthy environments for children and adolescents.

Pediatricians are in a unique position to help families understand these sites and to encourage healthy use and urge parents to monitor for potential problems with cyberbullying, “Facebook depression,” sexting, and exposure to inappropriate content.

Most risks fall into the following categories: peer-to-peer; inappropriate content; lack of understanding of online privacy issues; and outside influences of third-party advertising groups.