The existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on a consideration of the following factors: How Does Teen Dating Violence Affect Our Schools?

Teen dating violence has serious consequences for victims and their schools.

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Youth dating violence video

Dating violence against adolescent girls and associated substance use, unhealthy weight control, sexual risk behavior, pregnancy, and suicidality.

Shifting Boundaries: Final Report on an Experimental Evaluation of a Youth Dating Violence Program in New York City Middle Schools.

Although they may not seem to welcome your involvement, teens in abusive situations definitely need the support of their parents.

Check out the Start Strong program for some great tips and resources on how to help your teens.

“Our schools need to be safe havens for all students, and it is critical that we provide school leaders with tools and resources to help them become stronger partners in reducing teen dating violence and other forms of gender-based violence…

Like bullying, teen dating violence has far-reaching consequences for the health and life outcomes of victims.

Love Is Not Abuse: A Teen Dating Violence and Abuse Prevention Curriculum High School Edition (PDF - 497 KB) Love is Not Abuse (2012) Provides lessons designed to help teenagers understand patterns of abuse in dating relationships and methods of prevention.

Preventing and Responding to Teen Dating Violence National Resource Center on Domestic Violence (2016) Emphasizes collaborative and multilevel approaches to the prevention of and response to teen dating violence by providing audience-specific information.

Resources and Publications NOTE: This fact sheet contains resources, including Web sites, created by a variety of outside organizations. Department of Education does not guarantee the accuracy of any information contained on the Web sites of these outside organizations. Korchmaros, Ph D, University of Arizona; Danah Boyd, Ph D, New York University; and Kathleen Basile, Ph D, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.