The ad’s been on air for at least a year and has been released in multiple countries.

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, which discusses male-dominating behavior, was a constant point of reference during d.bot’s development.

(Collinsworth said is definitely a bit of a mansplainer). For her, comments from men not only tread gender issues but also incorporate race. ” and “I dated someone who kind of looks like you.” You can also submit your own examples of what guys have said to you.

“I think we were almost jokingly talking about what kind of person could we emulate who doesn’t necessarily listen to what a person is typing to them, kind of used a bunch of pre-canned lines all the time and would kind of reflect a certain type of behavior,” Collinsworth told .

The chatbot is connected to a database with more than 100 responses.

Any time you send a message, an algorithm parses it for keywords and compares them to all of d.bot’s responses.

The more your keywords match a response, the more likely that’s the response will use.

(We just stuck with our first thought—”I feel weird pillow-talking a robot.”)Created by Sid Lee Paris with digital production by Jam3, the bot then sets to work at analyzing your voice.

The system can distinguish between male and female voices, and interpret multiple languages, including English, Italian, French, Portuguese and Polish. It isn’t clear how the analysis works (how does one measure “mystery”? We tried it twice and the percentages changed, though overall results were more or less the same—mysterious and sensual, while hopelessly wanting in sophistication and intensity. The bot then kicks you to Skyn’s website, where you can check out which of its condom boxes suit you best.

Why would you want to simulate a conversation with a robot when you already know what it’s like IRL?

Chin said that part of it is validation — knowing that is emblematic of a larger problem many people encounter.

An October 2015 report from the Pew Research Center called "Teens, Technology and Romantic Relationships" found that 35% of teen girls ages 13-17 blocked or unfriended someone who was flirting in a way that made them uncomfortable. According to an earlier Pew report from October 2014, "Online harassment is especially pronounced at the intersection of gender and youth: Women ages 18-24 are more likely than others to experience some of the more severe forms of harassment." Women are also more likely to be harassed on social media (73%) than men (59%).