was an early Christian monastery, believed to have been in the area of Aungier Street, currently occupied by Whitefriar Street Carmelite Church.

The city expanded rapidly from the 17th century and was briefly the second largest city in the British Empire before the Acts of Union in 1800.

Following the partition of Ireland in 1922, Dublin became the capital of the Irish Free State, later renamed Ireland.

Other localities in Ireland also bear the name Duibhlinn, variously anglicized as Devlin, Historically, scribes using the Gaelic script wrote bh with a dot over the b, rendering Duḃlinn or Duiḃlinn.

Those without knowledge of Irish omitted the dot, spelling the name as Dublin.

The subsequent Scandinavian settlement centred on the River Poddle, a tributary of the Liffey in an area now known as Wood Quay.

The Dubhlinn was a small lake used to moor ships; the Poddle connected the lake with the Liffey.

Following Mac Murrough's death, Strongbow declared himself King of Leinster after gaining control of the city.

In response to Strongbow's successful invasion, King Henry II of England reaffirmed his sovereignty by mounting a larger invasion in 1171 and pronounced himself Lord of Ireland.

It was upon the death of Muirchertach Mac Lochlainn in early 1166 that Ruaidrí Ua Conchobair, King of Connacht, proceeded to Dublin and was inaugurated King of Ireland without opposition.